07 November 2012

Blowout

Big Gay Race-DSC_6042- 9.29.12 The crowd at the Big Gay Race, in support of Minnesotans United for All Families. Photo by Joe Bielawa.
Last night's election was a nationwide blowout for gay rights. Maine and Maryland passed ballot initiatives legalizing same-sex marriage, and although Washington's mail-in balloting slows down the vote-counting, it looks like that state passed marriage equality, too. And here in Minnesota, we soundly rejected the proposal to put a ban on same-sex marriage in the state constitution — the final vote looks to be about 51% against the amendment.

Edited to add: Here's video of Minnesotans United Campaign Manager Richard Carlbom learning the resut at almost the last minute before the campaign's election night party had to call it a night — 1:45 a.m.



I didn't find out about the Minnesota result until I woke up this morning — it was close, and the friends who came by to watch returns had already headed home before President Obama finally gave his acceptance speech, and I'd spent most of Election Day helping Minnesotans United get out the vote in the student-heavy neighborhoods around the University of Minnesota's Minneapolis campus. Canvassing proved to be way better than spending the day refreshing political blogs and not getting anything else done. Walking around campus towards the end of the workday, I saw MNU's bright orange "I voted NO" stickers everywhere.

From the very beginning, I've been impressed about how truly broad the opposition to the amendment was, and how many straight people were willing to put in time and money to secure (or, at least, work towards securing) basic rights for their GLBT friends, neighbors, and family members. In the early days of phone-banking, the straights outnumbered the gays on the phones by a pretty wide margin, and straight supporters flooded the streets for the Big Gay Race and pitched in to raise millions of dollars for the campaign. I'll second Dan Savage and say, we couldn't have done it without them.

And let's not forget the support of the excellent and generous readers of this very site — thanks, yet again, for helping defeat the amendment.

This is really only a first step for Minnesota — even without a consitutional amendment, there's still a law on the books banning same-sex couples from marriage. But it's hard to deny that change is in the air, and there's a huge base of supporters already organized and excited about taking the next step. We're fired up. It feels pretty great.◼

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