21 May 2012

Tell the White House: Make government-funded research open-access

As J.B.S. Haldane put it, "I think ... that the public has a right to know what is going on inside the laboratories, for some of which it pays." He was referring to the need for scientists to explain their work in popular media—which, amen, brother Jack!—but the point holds with regard to access to original scientific articles, too.

It doesn't make much sense that U.S. citizens, whose taxes fund most of the basic science in this country, are then expected to pay upwards of $50 for a single PDF copy of a journal article presenting government-funded research results. The National Institutes of Health already requires that research it funds be archived online and accessible to the general public free of charge—why not expand that to all government-funded research? And hey, there's a way to suggest exactly that out to the man in charge: a petition on WhiteHouse.gov.
We believe in the power of the Internet to foster innovation, research, and education. Requiring the published results of taxpayer-funded research to be posted on the Internet in human and machine readable form would provide access to patients and caregivers, students and their teachers, researchers, entrepreneurs, and other taxpayers who paid for the research. Expanding access would speed the research process and increase the return on our investment in scientific research.

The highly successful Public Access Policy of the National Institutes of Health proves that this can be done without disrupting the research process, and we urge President Obama to act now to implement open access policies for all federal agencies that fund scientific research.
It needs 25,000 virtual signatures within 30 days before it'll get any meaningful attention, so sign this thing and then start badgering all your online "friends" about it, why don't you? Especially the jerks who keep filling your update stream with branded product promotions and/or time-sucking adorable cat videos and/or news about how they've just spent real money for a virtual cow—post this directly on their "walls," if those are even still a thing, with or without a witty and/or pleading comment appended.

I mean, it's Monday morning; it's not like you're going to get do anything else for the benefit of humanity in the next minute or two, you slacker.◼

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