12 April 2011

What's in that dissertation, anyway?

About to take the plunge. Photo by jby.
So, what with getting my sparrows in a row for my dissertation defense on Friday, I haven't written any new science post for this week. But! As it happens, I have written about most of the component chapters of my dissertation—so in lieu of something new this week, why not check out those posts?
  • The first chapter of my dissertation is a literature review about the phenomenon ecologists call ecological opportunity, and how it may or may not explain big, rapid evolutionary changes. I've also written about this topic for the Scientific American guest blog.
  • The second chapter uses phylogenetic methods to reconstruct what yucca moths were like before they were yucca moths.
  • The third chapter presents a mathematical model of coevolution between two species, and determines what kind of interactions—predation, parasitism, mutualism, competition—can cause those species to evolve greater diversity.
  • The fourth chapter is the latest work on my lab's big study of Joshua trees and their pollinators. The material I'm including in this chapter hasn't been reviewed and published yet, but you can read the most recent Joshua tree post to learn what we know so far, and what kinds of questions we still want to answer.
Regular posting resumes next week, provided that I pass my defense and the celebrating afterward doesn't interfere with my blogging capacity.

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